IPSE'S AUTHORS LAST 24h
Check all the Authors in the last 24h
IPSEs IN THE LAST 24H
  • Rachel Rizzo
    Rachel Rizzo “Putin will continue viewing the EU as tangential if he senses a lack of unity. This has been the case so far, making him negotiate directly with the US. Until the EU puts united capabilities behind rhetoric, they will continue to be pushed to the sidelines.” 4 hours ago
  • Sergey Lavrov
    Sergey Lavrov “If we don't receive a constructive answer, and the West continues its aggressive course, then Moscow, as our president said earlier many times, will undertake appropriate responsive measures.” 6 hours ago
  • Wendy Sherman
    Wendy Sherman “I have no idea whether [Putin's] made the ultimate decision, but we certainly see every indication that he is going to use military force sometime perhaps [between] now and the middle of February.” 6 hours ago
  • Liz Truss
    Liz Truss “We'll be bringing forward new legislation to make our sanctions regime tougher so we are able to target more companies and individuals in Russia. We will be bringing that forward in the next few days.” 6 hours ago
  • Rachel Rizzo
    Rachel Rizzo “In the case of Germany, the new government has not come out as strongly as it should have in diffusing this crisis because of its economic linkages with Russia and energy dependency through the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline. But this also makes Germany look weak.” 6 hours ago
  • Ivana Stradner
    Ivana Stradner “The Kremlin's decision to omit any mention of the EU in its 2021 National Security Strategy shows that Moscow does not consider the EU as an important actor in foreign policy any more.” 6 hours ago
  • Bruno Lété
    Bruno Lété “Some EU nations have foreign policies which aim to appease Russia. Their aim is to break the Kremlin's autocratic relation with China and also improve their own economic ties with Russia. Countries in the EU's eastern bloc, who have experienced the Kremlin's threats in the past, have foreign policies which seek to respond to Russia through military solutions which display strength and power. So this creates a disagreement over responding to the crisis in Ukraine.” 6 hours ago
View All IPSEs inserted in the Last 24h
NEW CONTEXTS IN THE LAST 24H
  • No New Contexts inserted in the last 24 hours
View All New Contexts inserted in the last 24h

Covid-19 vaccine

Page with all the IPSEs stored in the archive related to the Context Covid-19 vaccine.
The IPSEs are presented in chronological order based on when the IPSEs have been pronounced.

“The question is: is this going to be like influenza - against which an annual vaccine is recommended - or is it going to be like measles? - which requires only two doses for life-long protection. That's where many of us disagree.”

author
Professor at the University of Michigan’s school of public health
Read More

“What we know now of course is that the patients, people who are becoming seriously ill, who are being hospitalised, are those who have not been vaccinated and those who have not had their boosters.”

author
Chair of the British Medical Association
Read More

“This Christmas, before sitting down to your dinner with your family, I would encourage anyone not already boosted to come forward, book an appointment and get the gift of a jab.”

author
Head of the NHS COVID-19 vaccination programme
Read More

“Getting vaccines to those who need them most must be a priority for every single government - not just some. If we don't, we will continue to see the virus change and threaten us in ways that will bring us closer to the beginning rather than closer to the end.”

author
World Health Organization (WHO) epidemiologist
Read More

“We're now at a point of having more than a billion doses a month of vaccines being produced, but it's a slow trickle still to get to low-income countries and lower middle-income countries. So we have not solved the supply challenge by any means, but we are closer to solving it than we ever have been. Looking forward to 2022 I think the entire game is really going to be about vaccination. So how do we get from airports to arms? How do we convert vaccines to vaccinations? I think we are woefully under-resourced and under-prepared for that … There's good progress to build from but much, much more work to do and financing gaps in the billions if not tens of billions of dollars.”

author
Founding director of the Global Health Innovation Center at Duke University in the US
Read More

“Everybody wants to know about the boosters, when it's needed, how often it's going to be needed and so on. There are many factors that can influence this. One is the type of vaccine. We know that each vaccine has a slightly different performance and longer follow up is telling us the efficacy of the vaccines, particularly in preventing severe disease but also in preventing infection. The other big variable of course is, the variants of the virus that we are seeing. And we've seen that different variants have different abilities to be neutralized by the antibodies, or be able to overcome the immune response, like Omicron seems to be doing because of the mutations it has it seems to be pretty good at evading immune responses. The third factor of course is the biology of the individual, the age of the person, how strong the immune system is, whether there are other underlying illnesses which impact the immune system. And therefore when we make recommendations for a course of vaccination, we have to take into consideration all of these factors. There is some data now to show that there is a slippage in the protection due to the different vaccines at about six months or so, particularly for protection from infection, less so for protection from disease; they are still performing at 80%. But with Omicron again, the initial data coming in obviously showing that Omicron is very successfully able to evade immune responses and therefore needs higher levels of antibodies. For now we believe that boosters may be needed for people who have weaker immune systems, the older individuals, the more vulnerable people and whether a third dose of the vaccine is going to be it, or whether they are going to be need for additional vaccines like influenza every year, every couple of years, it's too early to say and we need to really follow the science on that.”

author
World Health Organization’s (WHO) chief scientist
Read More

“If you're asking me what my personal position is, two or three years ago, I would never have thought to witness what we see right now that we have this horrible pandemic. We have the vaccines, the life-saving vaccines, but they are not being used adequately everywhere. And this costs … This is an enormous health cost coming along. If you look at the numbers, we have now 77% of the adults in the European Union vaccinated or if you take the whole population, it's 66%. And this means one-third of the European population is not vaccinated. These are 150 million people. This is a lot, and not each and every one can be vaccinated - children, for example, or people with special medical conditions - but the vast majority could and therefore, I think it is understandable and appropriate to lead this discussion now. How we can encourage and potentially think about mandatory vaccination within the European Union, this needs discussion. This needs a common approach, but it is a discussion that I think has to be met.”

author
President of the European Commission
Read More

“The efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines for the elderly has been reduced due to the emergence of the more virulent and aggressive Delta variant. Neither the government nor medical experts expected critical cases to increase so quickly.”

author
Professor of infectious diseases at Hallym University Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital
Read More

“In many countries and communities, we are concerned about a false sense of security that vaccines have ended the pandemic, and that people who are vaccinated do not need to take any other precautions. Vaccines save lives, but they do not fully prevent transmission.”

author
Director-General of the World Health Organization
Read More

“It's hard to know what's coming next with this virus. We thought we knew, but delta really surprised us. We thought the vaccine would help end this, but things are still dragging on. It's hard to know what's going to happen next.”

author
Expert on virus transmission at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va
Read More

“For those over 65, getting a booster helps cover your bases to make sure you are extra-, extra-protected, because the consequences are higher. It's easy with all the discussion about boosters to lose that really important message that the vaccines are still working. Going from an unvaccinated to a vaccinated person is still the critical step.”

author
Deputy director for science in the Office of Public Health at the New York State Department of Health
Read More

“The main objective of the Covid vaccine is to prevent severe disease and death, and they are still doing a good job at that. With true declines in vaccine effectiveness, we'll likely see more cases overall.”

author
Faculty member at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Read More

“I think about sleepless nights when we get a huge number of patients who didn't even bother to use banal protective means. Patients who have gotten the vaccine usually don't have serious symptoms while the unvaccinated come to regret it. Patients who survive after a grave course of illness tell us when they are discharged, 'Doctor, you were right and I will tell everyone that it's necessary to get the vaccine'.”

author
Internist of Internal Medicine Department No. 4 of the Moscow City Clinical Hospital 52
Read More

“Vaccines can reduce the transmission of the virus, its severe complications, and its death rate, though it will continue to mutate and linger. However it could pose less danger over time and become something more akin to a seasonal flu. Humans must eventually learn to live with the COVID-19 virus.”

author
Taiwanese virologist and Academia Sinica researcher
Read More

“Mandates do work. I want to emphasise here that nobody's talking about forced vaccinations. It's that if you want to be a healthcare provider, you need to get a vaccine. If you want to work in a classroom full of unvaccinated children, you need to get the vaccine. The point isn't to be punitive. It's about keeping society safe.”

author
Professor of law at Baruch College, the City University of New York
Read More

“Mandatory schemes during a crisis will be counterproductive. When people have what we call conspiracy theories or they have misbeliefs or misunderstandings, [such schemes] will only strengthen their opinions.”

author
Indonesian epidemiologist who advises the WHO on pandemic recovery
Read More

“There is a very clear connection between human rights and mandatory vaccinations. It is 100 percent a human rights issue related to the right to privacy and the right to bodily integrity. Human rights protect our bodies and our ability to be the masters of our bodies. The consequence of this is our ability to determine our medical treatments. But this right is not absolute. Governments can interfere with it if they can justify such interference as necessary for and proportionate to the achievement of another valuable goal.”

author
Professor in human rights law at the University of Liverpool
Read More

“The United States is buying another half a billion doses of Pfizer to donate to low- and middle-income countries around the world. We're not going to solve this crisis with half measures or middle-of-the-road ambitions. We need to go big. And we need to do our part - governments, the private sector, civil society leaders, philanthropists.”

author
President of the United States
Read More
IPSEs by Author
IPSEs by Country
arrow